Modern Literature & Culture Research Centre & Gallery

Wednesday, June 16, 2:00–6:00 PM EDT

Virtual Event Registration online

Join us as we explore themes and processes of social change through the theory and praxis of exhibition, curation, and literary cultures. From the modernist period through to the COVID-19 pandemic, we consider how artists and public intellectuals curated cultural shifts and historical upheavals. Keynote speakers include scholars Christopher Gilbert and Natalie Loveless. This event centrally involves academic papers and creative projects from Communication and Culture graduate students as part of the course, CC8836/CMCT 6135 Selected Topics in Media and Culture: Exhibition, Curation, and Literary Cultures.
 

Welcome

2:00–2:05pm
 

Opening Keynote

2:05–2:40pm
 

Opening Keynote: Christopher Gilbert | Curating Social Change Symposium from MLC Research Centre on Vimeo.

 

Christopher Gilbert (Assumption University), Caricature and National Character: The United States at War

In the opening presentation, scholar Christopher Gilbert discusses his new book Caricature and National Character: The United States at War (Pennsylvania State University Press), which examines the long history of US war politics through the lens of political cartoons to provide new, unique insights into American cultural identity. Christopher Gilbert is Assistant Professor of English at Assumption University.
 

Panel 1: Cultural Upheaval & Reconstructions

2:50–3:50pm
 

Panel 1: Cultural Upheaval & Reconstructions | Curating Social Change Symposium from MLC Research Centre on Vimeo.

 

New York Dada and Social Change: An Intersectional Approach

Esmée Colbourne
 

Social and Cultural Change at Sylvia Beach's Shakespeare & Company

Caitlyn Ng
 

(Pre)Feminist Art Praxis: The Stettheimer Salon and Socially Engaged Resistance

Katie Huckson
 

Culture and Aesthetic Shifts at 27 Rue de Fleurus: The Gertrude Stein Salon

Nikole McGregor
 

Panel 2: Aesthetics of Social (Dis)Order

4:00–5:00pm
 

Panel 2: Aesthetics of Social (Dis)Order | Curating Social Change Symposium from MLC Research Centre on Vimeo.

 

Portable Museums, Corporality, and Social Change: Curating the Dada Baroness Elsa

Natalie Ilsley
 

Western Art Institutions, Indigeneity, and Social Change: The Case of George Hunt and Franz Boas

Shanice Wolters
 

Apocalypse: Art Making and Music in a Perpetual End of the World

Oyindamola Esho
 

Performing the Personal Archive: The Pandemic, Social Change, and Documentary Video Art

Amy Siegel
 

Closing Keynote

5:10–5:50pm
 

Closing Keynote: Natalie Loveless | Curating Social Change Symposium from MLC Research Centre on Vimeo.

 

Natalie Loveless (University of Alberta), How to Make Art at the End of the World: A Manifesto for Research-Creation

Closing the symposium is scholar Natalie Loveless, who presents her critically acclaimed book How to Make Art at the End of the World: A Manifesto for Research-Creation (Duke University Press). The book draws on diverse perspectives—from feminist science studies to psychoanalytic theory, as well as her own experience advising undergraduate and graduate students—to argue for research-creation as both a means to produce innovative scholarship and a way to transform pedagogy and research within the contemporary neoliberal university. Natalie Loveless is Associate Professor of Contemporary Art and Theory at the University of Alberta.
 

Book Giveaway

5:50–5:55pm
 

Closing Remarks

5:55–6:00pm
 


Event Planning

Logistics and Technology Support: Nikole McGregor & Caitlyn Ng
Communication and Liaison: Esmée Colbourne & Natalie Ilsley
Stakeholder Engagement: Amy Siegel & Shanice Wolters
Symposium Moderators: Oyindamola Esho & Katie Huckson

Thanks

We thank the following without whom this symposium would not have been possible: the MA and PhD students in CC8836/CMCT 6135 Selected Topics in Media and Culture: Exhibition, Curation, and Literary Cultures; Irene Gammel for her care, passion, and stewardship; Jason Wang and Cameron MacDonald for their logistics and planning; and Allison Kinahan and Lauren Seto for their assistance with communication. We thank Georgiana Uhlyarik, Fredrik S. Eaton Curator at the Art Gallery of Ontario, for giving a passionate and insightful guest lecture in the course. We especially thank Christopher Gilbert and Natalie Loveless for their time and intellectual generosity in delivering keynote remarks at this symposium.

Program

Download or view the symposium program (PDF)

Curating Social Change Graduate Symposium


Wednesday, June 16, 2:00-6:00 PM EDT
Free of charge and open to the general public

To confirm your RSVP, input the required information and click the red “Submit” button. You will receive an e-mail with the Zoom room details confirming your attendance before the symposium.
 

If you do not receive an e-mail or have any difficulties confirming your RSVP, please e-mail Research Coordinator Cameron MacDonald at adminmlc@ryerson.ca.


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