Ryerson University

Date: October 14-17, 2008, Dublin, Ireland BY: Dr. Irene Gammel

On a rainy day we land in Dublin, a city with a distinct old-world feeling in its architecture but surprising cosmopolitan flair. The signage is in Gaelic (they prefer we say “Irish”) and English but it is the general lack of signage combined with driving on the left (wrong!) side of the street that present a challenge as we enter the city by car. Everywhere we go we meet people with messianic energy in sharing their stories. No wonder this is a country of literati such as Wilde, Joyce, Beckett, or Toibin. 

We stop to ask for directions at a pub and warm ourselves near a fireplace, and as we inspect the turf that’s used to keep the cozy fire going, another patron—a man in his fifties with lively blue eyes, a shock of grey hair, and no teeth—proceeds to enlighten us with an in-depth account of how the turf is harvested. Similarly, as we sit in the hotel lobby, a man in his forties involves us in an in-depth account of how Irish religion blends pagan and druidic elements into its Catholicism. We are in the city of James Joyce, where we see quotations of Ulysses inscribed at the O’Connell Bridge, which spans the River Liffey. 

At lunch we eat fish and chips at the O’Donahue pub off Grafton Street, sitting underneath a wooden cupola window that looks the same as when Joyce walked the streets of Dublin. During the days, I research Joyce for a project related to the Baroness Elsa; during the evenings, I re-read Ulysses, which is like a guide into the inner world of old Dublin: “Hold to the now, the here, through which all future plunges to the past.” 

At Trinity College, Jean-Paul engages with faculty and students at an exhibit hosted by the Psychology and Bio-Engineering departments at a nearby gallery. The spaces resemble the famed Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 Click here to view photographs of Dublin and research in action.

Recent News

Florine Stettheimer's Multimodal Modernism – Inaugural Symposium 2017 and Soirée at the Art Gallery of Ontario

Florine Stettheimer's Multimodal Modernism – ...

An exploration of the work of Jazz-era New York saloniere, painter, and poet Florine Stettheimer, as well as the work of her sisters

Lucy Wowk joins MLC

Lucy Wowk joins MLC

Lucy Wowk is a BA student in Creative Industries (2014-2018), specializing in print and curatorial practices, with a particular interest in ...

Avantgarde Artist Mina Loy

Avantgarde Artist Mina Loy

Mina Loy is a bold avant-garde poet and visual artist. Her work is being recognized with a 2017 National Endowment for the Humanities grant.

Jenna McClelland joins MLC

Jenna McClelland joins MLC

An MA student in Ryerson’s Literatures of Modernity Programme (2016-2017), Jenna McClelland specializes in the study of punk ...

The Great War in Literature and Visual Culture

MLC Themes

The Great War in Literature and Visual Culture

Amid the unprecedented social change of World War I, women renegotiated their identities by dramatically changing the way they engaged with the arts. But how did they do so? And how did everyday citizens engage with the war?

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

MLC Themes

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, considered by many to be the mother of Dada, was a daringly innovative poet and an early creator of junk sculpture. “The Baroness” was best known for her sexually charged, often controversial performances.

Modernism in the World

MLC Themes

Modernism in the World

Recent research has departed from the Euro-centric and national view of Modernism to include approaches and methods studying Modernism across national boundaries and across different art forms to include fashion, dance, performance, technology, and visual culture.

Lucy Maud Montgomery

MLC Themes

Lucy Maud Montgomery

L.M. Montgomery is perhaps Canada's most important literary export. She was prolific writer of over 500 short stories and poems, and twenty novels, including the beloved Anne of Green Gables.

Canadian Modernism

MLC Themes

Canadian Modernism

The works of numerous Canadian authors who lived during the modernist era may well constitute the most central and experimental articulation of Canadian modernism in prose, allowing authors to stage cross-cultural, controversial, and even conflicted identities.

Modernist Biography and Life Writing

MLC Themes

Modernist Biography and Life Writing

Life writing, including autobiographical accounts, diaries, letters and testimonials written or told by women and men whose political, literary or philosophical purposes are central to their lives, has become a standard tool for communication and the dissemination of information.