Ryerson University

Contact

doina.popescu@ryerson.ca

Doina Popescu is the Founding Director of the Ryerson Image Centre (RIC), a public gallery and cultural destination in the heart of Ryerson University campus and downtown Toronto, where she spearheaded an international program of exhibitions, research, academic publications and archival collections in photography and related media. She has held the position of Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Ryerson University, working on special projects with the Provost and Vice President Academic. Prior to these posts, Doina served as the Deputy Director and Program Curator of the Goethe-Institut Toronto. For over 30 years she has been deeply involved with both Canadian and international artists and scholars in the visual arts, film, literature, music, cultural theory, history and philosophy. Doina’s interests intersect with the concerns of the MLC Research Centre on many fronts. For example, under her leadership, the first major exhibition presented by the RIC was Edward Burtynsky: Oil (curated by Paul Roth), followed by shows such as Archival Dialogues: Reading the Black Star Collection (curated by Doina Popescu and Peggy Gale), Berenice Abbott: Photographs (curated by Gaëlle Morel, co-produced with the Jeu de Paume, Paris, France) and Human Rights Human Wrongs (curated by Mark Sealy MBE, co-produced with Autograph ABP, London, England), among many others. She is the team lead for Remembering the Real Winnie (curated by Irene Gammel and Kate Addleman-Frankel), which is on loan in Winnipeg’s Assiniboine Park Pavilion Gallery (November 2016 - October 2017) and which is poised to subsequently travel internationally. Doina has published and co-published numerous multi-lingual exhibition catalogues, research based books and a professional journal. Her current research interests revolve around themes of fiction and non-fiction in the arts, archival practices and the pedagogical potential of the digital.

The Great War in Literature and Visual Culture

MLC Themes

The Great War in Literature and Visual Culture

Amid the unprecedented social change of World War I, women renegotiated their identities by dramatically changing the way they engaged with the arts. But how did they do so? And how did everyday citizens engage with the war?

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

MLC Themes

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, considered by many to be the mother of Dada, was a daringly innovative poet and an early creator of junk sculpture. “The Baroness” was best known for her sexually charged, often controversial performances.

Modernism in the World

MLC Themes

Modernism in the World

Recent research has departed from the Euro-centric and national view of Modernism to include approaches and methods studying Modernism across national boundaries and across different art forms to include fashion, dance, performance, technology, and visual culture.

Lucy Maud Montgomery

MLC Themes

Lucy Maud Montgomery

L.M. Montgomery is perhaps Canada's most important literary export. She was prolific writer of over 500 short stories and poems, and twenty novels, including the beloved Anne of Green Gables.

Canadian Modernism

MLC Themes

Canadian Modernism

The works of numerous Canadian authors who lived during the modernist era may well constitute the most central and experimental articulation of Canadian modernism in prose, allowing authors to stage cross-cultural, controversial, and even conflicted identities.

Modernist Biography and Life Writing

MLC Themes

Modernist Biography and Life Writing

Life writing, including autobiographical accounts, diaries, letters and testimonials written or told by women and men whose political, literary or philosophical purposes are central to their lives, has become a standard tool for communication and the dissemination of information.