Ryerson University

Contact

juliwill@yorku.ca

Julianna K. Will is a research assistant at the MLC Research Centre working with Dr. Irene Gammel and her team on scholarly transcriptions of modernist texts. She is a Ph.D. candidate (ABD) in the Department of English at York University (2015-2020), having previously completed an MA in Classics at Queen’s University (2015) and a BA (hons.) in Classics at Trent University (2011). Julianna’s research explores classical reception in Victorian literature, with an emphasis on the plays of Euripides, the focus also of her MA thesis, "Euripides’s Antiope and the Theban Trilogy," which includes a full translation, reconstruction, and commentary.

Doctoral Dissertation

Will, Julianna K. “‘The Horror and the Glory’: Euripides Among the Victorians.” PhD in English. Faculty of Graduate Studies. York University (in progress). Supervisor: Dr. Lesley Higgins. 

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Review of Oscar Wilde and Classical Antiquity, edited by Kathleen Riley, Alastair J. L. Blanshard, and Iarla Manny. Bryn Mawr Classical Review (2018). 12. 37.

Peer-Reviewed Conference Papers

“That ‘never-ending rustle of poplar trees’: Pater, Hopkins, Monet.” North American Victorian Studies Association (Columbus OH), October 2019. Co-authored with Lesley Higgins. (refereed)

“Victorian Boyhood and the Hippolytus Paradigm.” VSAO panel at ACCUTE (Vancouver BC), June 2019. (refereed)

“Consuming Maidenheads: Hymens and Hymen Metaphors in Victorian Print Culture.” Victorian Studies Association of Ontario (Toronto, ON), April 2019. (refereed)

“Wilde Boys Who Won’t Leave Neverland: Classical Myth and Victorian Manhood in Dorian Gray and Peter Pan.” Victorian Studies Network at York, November 2018, (invited)

“Writing Like a Poet: Epic Simile in Aurora Leigh.” North American Victorian Studies Association, Supernumerary Conference, Florence, 15–18 May 2017. (refereed)

The Great War in Literature and Visual Culture

MLC Themes

The Great War in Literature and Visual Culture

Amid the unprecedented social change of World War I, women renegotiated their identities by dramatically changing the way they engaged with the arts. But how did they do so? And how did everyday citizens engage with the war?

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

MLC Themes

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, considered by many to be the mother of Dada, was a daringly innovative poet and an early creator of junk sculpture. “The Baroness” was best known for her sexually charged, often controversial performances.

Modernism in the World

MLC Themes

Modernism in the World

Recent research has departed from the Euro-centric and national view of Modernism to include approaches and methods studying Modernism across national boundaries and across different art forms to include fashion, dance, performance, technology, and visual culture.

Lucy Maud Montgomery

MLC Themes

Lucy Maud Montgomery

L.M. Montgomery is perhaps Canada's most important literary export. She was prolific writer of over 500 short stories and poems, and twenty novels, including the beloved Anne of Green Gables.

Canadian Modernism

MLC Themes

Canadian Modernism

The works of numerous Canadian authors who lived during the modernist era may well constitute the most central and experimental articulation of Canadian modernism in prose, allowing authors to stage cross-cultural, controversial, and even conflicted identities.

Modernist Biography and Life Writing

MLC Themes

Modernist Biography and Life Writing

Life writing, including autobiographical accounts, diaries, letters and testimonials written or told by women and men whose political, literary or philosophical purposes are central to their lives, has become a standard tool for communication and the dissemination of information.