Ryerson University

Contact

robert.teigrob@ryerson.ca

Robert Teigrob holds a PhD in American Studies from the University of New Mexico and an MA in US History from the University of New York at Albany. He is an associate professor in the History Department at Ryerson University. His research on war and culture, with focus also on the First World War, centrally intersects with the mandate of the Modern Literature and Culture Research Centre. He is the author of Living With War: Twentieth-Century Conflict in Canadian and American History and Memory (University of Toronto Press, Fall 2015), which examines the linkages and discrepancies in the ways in which Canada and the United States make sense of their international conflicts. A previous book, Warming Up to the Cold War: Canada and the United States’ Coalition of the Willing, from Hiroshima to Korea (UTP, 2009) traced the influence of American politics and culture on Canadian attitudes toward the Cold War. He worked as an archivist for the Hudson’s Bay Company Archives and the Minnesota Historical Society, and as a cultural resources consultant.

 

Books

Teigrob, Robert. Living With War: Twentieth-Century Conflict in Canadian and American History and Memory. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, Fall 2015.

Teigrob, Robert. Warming Up to the Cold War: Canada and the United States’ Coalition of the Willing, from Hiroshima to Korea. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2009.

Selected Papers in Refereed Journals

Teigrob, Robert. “Empire and Cultures of Militarism in Canada and the United States,” American Review of Canadian Studies, 43, 1 (March 2013): 30-48.

 Teigrob, Robert. “Glad Adventures, Tragedies, Silences: Remembering and Forgetting Wars for Empire in Canada and the United States,” International Journal of Canadian Studies / Revue internationale d’études canadiennes, 45-46 (2012): 441-465.

Teigrob, Robert. “’Which Kind of Imperialism?’ Early Cold War Decolonization and Canada-US Relations,” Canadian Review of American Studies 37, 3 (2007): 403-430.

The Great War in Literature and Visual Culture

MLC Themes

The Great War in Literature and Visual Culture

Amid the unprecedented social change of World War I, women renegotiated their identities by dramatically changing the way they engaged with the arts. But how did they do so? And how did everyday citizens engage with the war?

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

MLC Themes

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven

Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, considered by many to be the mother of Dada, was a daringly innovative poet and an early creator of junk sculpture. “The Baroness” was best known for her sexually charged, often controversial performances.

Modernism in the World

MLC Themes

Modernism in the World

Recent research has departed from the Euro-centric and national view of Modernism to include approaches and methods studying Modernism across national boundaries and across different art forms to include fashion, dance, performance, technology, and visual culture.

Lucy Maud Montgomery

MLC Themes

Lucy Maud Montgomery

L.M. Montgomery is perhaps Canada's most important literary export. She was prolific writer of over 500 short stories and poems, and twenty novels, including the beloved Anne of Green Gables.

Canadian Modernism

MLC Themes

Canadian Modernism

The works of numerous Canadian authors who lived during the modernist era may well constitute the most central and experimental articulation of Canadian modernism in prose, allowing authors to stage cross-cultural, controversial, and even conflicted identities.

Modernist Biography and Life Writing

MLC Themes

Modernist Biography and Life Writing

Life writing, including autobiographical accounts, diaries, letters and testimonials written or told by women and men whose political, literary or philosophical purposes are central to their lives, has become a standard tool for communication and the dissemination of information.